Dismantled: A Scientific Deconstruction of the Theory of Evolution

Over the years, I have read (and met) several creation scientists for whom I developed great respect. For example, I consider Dr. John Sanford’s work to be not only brilliant, but also very important when it comes to understanding genetics and evolution. I have been fortunate enough to get to know him personally, and his keen intellect is overshadowed only by his deep devotion to our Lord. I personally think of him as a scientist on par with John Ray or Robert Boyle.

I recently got an email from him promoting a documentary entitled Dismantled: A Scientific Deconstruction of the Theory of Evolution. I am not a fan of documentaries, because they often devolve into propaganda pieces. However, since Dr. Sanford is featured in it, along with other creationist luminaries like Dr. Robert Carter, Dr. Georgia Purdom, and Dr. Nathaniel T. Jeanson, I decided to watch it.

Overall, I was quite pleased. I didn’t like the beginning very much (more about that in a moment), but once the documentary got into the serious science, I thought it did a very good job of communicating important truths about nature in a way that non-scientists can understand.

Early on, for example, it makes the standard (and important) distinction between microevolution and macroevolution. It discusses how dogs descended from wolves and then makes the point that this microevolution is well understood: It involves using selection to discard genetic information instead of producing new genetic information. This, of course, is the opposite of what is needed for macroevolution, the naturalist’s creation myth. To illustrate this fact, the documentary makes the point that you can selectively breed wolves to make Chihuahuas, but because of the loss of information required by the process, you cannot selectively breed Chihuahuas to make wolves. I have never heard it put quite that way before.

The documentary spends a lot of time on human evolution, looking at both the genetic issues and the fossil evidence. Dr. Sanford brings up the “waiting time” problem that he has done original research on, which shows that the genetic changes required to go from some ape-like creature to man would take much, much longer than the evolutionary timescale allows. The Laetoli footprints are discussed, as are many of the other fossil-related problems with human evolution. One of the best parts of this section is where Dr. Carter discusses how evolutionists ignore the measured mutation rates in populations because they aren’t consistent with evolutionary theory. Thus, they replace the known mutation rates with ones that have been calculated to be consistent with evolutionary theory.

Speaking of Dr. Carter, he has the best line in the documentary. Towards the end, he sums up the recent genetic evidence for mitochondrial Eve, Y-chromosome Adam, a human population bottleneck, etc. He discusses how evolutionists didn’t expect any of these things, but they are necessary if the Biblical account is true. He then says:

So what we’re seeing over time is that the evolutionary model is getting more Biblical.

While I had never thought of it that way, I completely agree!

Now before I end, I do want to point out that I strongly disagree with the first part of the documentary, which tries to claim that evolution isn’t really science; it’s history. As such, it’s not the same as the science that cures disease and makes Mars rovers, because it studies something that is not repeatable: the past. This is a very common assertion among creationists, but it is utterly false.

In fact, epidemiology has cured disease by studying the past. More importantly, the study of the past is definitely repeatable. We cannot repeat the past itself, but we can study the evidence related to the past, develop a hypothesis, and then test that hypothesis with more observations of the evidence related to the past. We can repeat such observations in different parts of the world, and if the hypothesis is repeatedly verified, it is just as scientific as a hypothesis about a medical procedure. A theory is scientific if it makes predictions that can be observationally verified. This is true whether the theory is about the past, present, or future.

Despite this glaring flaw, I do think the documentary is worth watching, especially if you need an overview of how the latest scientific discoveries support the creationist position.

NOTE: You can watch the documentary on Answers TV as part of a free trial and then see if you like Answers TV enough to continue the subscription.

8 thoughts on “Dismantled: A Scientific Deconstruction of the Theory of Evolution”

  1. One thing I tell militant atheists is, yes, God is real and it’s being proved one scientist at a time. They return with some interesting but not publishable replies.
    Long ages evolutionists grow louder, more mocking because they cannot prove it with science. As time goes on, they’re forced to agree more with Bible data and that’s thanks to you and others. god’s peace to you.

  2. Like Creationism, macro-evolution is an Historical Science. They gather their evidence after the fact and must reconstruct from that evidence what really happened. Because of the forensic nature of the evidence the scientist must decide what to collect and what is not relevant. We may never find all the pieces of an event and therefore skew our interpretation of it.
    We may dig up a bunch of bones in the ground and begin to weigh them, measure them and even articulate them, but whether this fossilized animal is an ancestor of another fossilized animal is still beyond our capacity to know.

  3. Thanks for the review, Jay. I also looked at this documentary recently.
    I note your criticism of the idea of “historical science”. You say “A theory is scientific if it makes predictions that can be observationally verified. This is true whether the theory is about the past, present, or future”. I find this difficult to understand when observations can only be made in the present. Can you supply a reference that explains it for me?

    1. Observations can only be made in the present, but they can be repeated in different situations to test a hypothesis about the past in many different ways. Consider, for example, carbon-14 in dinosaur fossils. First, we were assured that there would not be any carbon-14 in dinosaur fossils, because they are simply too old. However, when observations were made, we found out there was a lot of carbon-14 in dinosaur fossils. So observations made in the present falsified a statement made about the past.

      Now that we have the observation, old-earthers say that it is the result of contamination. Young-earthers say it is because the fossils are only thousands of years old. Once again, the two explanations can be tested scientifically in the present. In the link above, I discuss the young-earth arguments against contamination. In one of them, researchers tested carbon-14 levels in the vicinity of the fossil and found that it decreased the farther away the sample was from the fossil. That is a good indication carbon-14 was leaking out, not in, falsifying the contamination hypothesis. If that observation were repeated on several different fossils at several different sites and the same results found each time, that would strengthen the scientific argument against contamination. This is an example of how observations in the present can be repeated to better confirm or falisfy a hypothesis about the past.

      Another example from that same study is that the carbon-14 testing was repeated on several different kinds of fossils. With the repeated testing, a pattern emerged: there were four distinct groups with different carbon-14 levels, and the grouping was based on the type of fossil. Thus, repeated testing in the present produced a new scientific insight about the past: it’s something about the nature of the organism that affects the how the carbon-14 levels have decayed in the past. My guess is that more repeated testing of fossils will produce a few more groups, and once the pattern is more fully observed, a solid scientific conclusion might be reached about what happened in regards to carbon-14 during and after the fossilization process.

      Here is another example, taken from genetics. I was taught at university that nylon-digesting bacteria were a recently-developed strain which resulted from mutations that occured in a population which was exposed to nylon. However, Cordova and Sanford made observations in the present that demonstrated they are not a recent strain. Thus, once again, observations in the present tested a scientific statement about the past.

      There are literally thousands of examples like this, and they all show that science is science, whether it is about the past, present, or future.

      1. Thanks for the reply Jay. You say that “a theory is scientific if it makes predictions that can be observationally verified”. So I can now see that science can deal with a theory about the past if it is able to be tested by observations in the present.
        Would you agree that the conflict isn’t between “observational science” and “historical science”, but between either two different types of “historical science” or two different versions of history?
        By the way, “Observational science” sounds like a tautology to me as all science should be observable (or testable), otherwise it is just speculation. This sounds OK for experimental science, but what about theoretical science?
        As “forensic science” is a branch of science, then “historical science” could also be a branch of science that deals with historical events/times. In the following blogpost I used the term “ancient forensic science” to refer to the “big-bang” theory and the theory of evolution. I would appreciate your comments on how this post could be corrected or improved.
        https://georgesjournal.net/2013/10/02/using-history-and-science-to-investigate-ancient-times/

        1. I would agree that the conflict is between different interpretations of the past. I also agree that “observational science” is a tautology. Theoretical science isn’t science until it is tested experimentally. What makes a theory scientific is that it can be used to make predictions. Theoretical science makes the predictions, and experimental science tests those predictions. Experimental science by itself has little (or no) explanatory power. Theoretical science has explanatory power, but those explanations have no scientific value unless they can make predictions that are tested with experimental science.

          I think your analogy between forensic science and science that deals with past events is a good one, but I disagree that history trumps science when dealing with the past. Eyewitnesses, for example, don’t always trump forensic science. Eyewitnesses can be notoriously unreliable, and forensic science can often be used to show that an eyewitness’s testimony is wrong. In criminal investigations, the case is strong when the eyewitness testimony and the forensic science agree. In the same way, some historical documents are notoriously unreliable, so the interpretation about the past is strong when the historical documents and the relevant science agree.

  4. Thanks for the reply Jay. I note your comments on theoretical science and experimental science, which raises questions like:
    Can the big bang model be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?
    Can the theory of biological evolution be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?
    Can the biblical account of creation (Genesis 1-2) be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?
    Can the biblical account of the flood (Genesis 6-8) be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?

    Also, thanks for the comments on my 2013 post. You noted that the conclusion doesn’t apply to unreliable eyewitnesses and unreliable history. As the historical record discussed in this post comes from the Bible, it is reliable. To clarify this, in the second sentence of the conclusion I will add the word “reliable” before the word “history”.

    1. Thanks for your reply, George. In answer to your questions:

      >Can the big bang model be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?

      Yes and yes. It makes both assumptions and predictions that can be tested. For example, a fundamental assumption of the Big Bang is that on a large enough scale, the universe is homogeneous. That has been falsified. It made a prediction that there should be a cosmic background of energy. That has been confirmed. Even though that prediction has been confirmed, the details of this background are inconsistent with the Big Bang. So there are three examples of how experimental science has tested the Big Bang. It failed two tests and passed one. Since it can be tested, it is falsifiable. However, falsifying a wide-ranging theory in its entirety takes a lot of falsified predictions.

      >Can the theory of biological evolution be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?

      Yes and yes. I have several examples of how predictions of the theory have been falsfied. Once again, falsifying a wide-ranging theory in its entirety takes a lot of falsified predictions. I do think you are seeing the beginnings of scientists admitting that biological evolution as it is formulated now has been falsified. This is why the secular scientific literature regularly publishes papers challenging it, and even atheists are starting to admit it.

      >Can the biblical account of creation (Genesis 1-2) be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?

      Yes and yes. I have several examples of how modern observations test the creation account. All of those could have gone the other way, so yes, the account is falsifiable as well.

      >Can the biblical account of the flood (Genesis 6-8) be tested by experimental science? Is it falsifiable?

      Yes and yes. Once again, the Flood model makes lots of predictions about what we should currently see in the geological record. In large part, those predictions have been confirmed. They could also have been falsified.

      >To clarify this, in the second sentence of the conclusion I will add the word “reliable” before the word “history”.

      Yes.

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